Tech Tip 17: Miniaturisation in GC laboratories – Part III

Method miniaturisation is the squeezing of as many instrumental and analytical parameters as possible to optimise efficiency. Variables that can be examined include extraction solvent, extraction technique, injection onto the column, separation on column, quantification via the detector and finally the cycle time of one analytical run. As we strive to make the method more robust we should improve quality, obtain an equivalent if not better Limit of Detection (LOD) and deliver the result more quickly and hence more cheaply.

Injection onto the column

Tech Tip 16: Miniaturisation in GC laboratories – Part II

GC extraction techniques

Method miniaturisation is the squeezing of as many instrumental and analytical parameters as possible to optimise efficiency. Variables that can be examined include extraction solvent, extraction technique, injection onto the column, separation on column, quantification via the detector and finally the cycle time of one analytical run. As we strive to make the method more robust we should improve quality, obtain an equivalent if not better Limit of Detection (LOD) and deliver the result more quickly and hence more cheaply.

The extraction technique

Tech Tip 15: Miniaturisation in GC laboratories – Part I

Method miniaturisation is the squeezing of as many instrumental and analytical parameters as possible to optimise efficiency. Variables that can be examined include extraction solvent, extraction technique, injection onto the column, separation on column, quantification via the detector and finally the cycle time of one analytical run. As we strive to make the method more robust we should improve quality, obtain an equivalent if not better Limit of Detection (LOD) and deliver the result more quickly and hence more cheaply.

Tech Tip 13: The importance of the use of the correct liner for the sample introduction technique selected

In the Sample Introduction section of our Complete GC & GC-MS course we highlight the importance of selecting the correct liner style for the injection type that you are going to perform. Here are some of the questions to ask.

Tech Tip 12: Use of Autosamplers – Part II

Modern autosamplers have become much more versatile and sophisticated than their original antecedents, so that they are not merely a device for replacing manual injection, they can now offer many options and improvements to the introduction of liquid and gaseous sample aliquots into a gas chromatograph. However, as with most analytical equipment, each function needs fine tuning to produce the best results. 

Tech Tip 11: Use of Autosamplers – Part I

Modern autosamplers have become much more versatile and sophisticated than their original antecedents, so that they are not merely a device for replacing manual injection, they can now offer many options and improvements to the introduction of liquid and gaseous sample aliquots into a gas chromatograph. However, as with most analytical equipment, each function needs fine tuning to produce the best results. 

Tech Tip 10: Installing a capillary column into a GC inlet/detector (Part II)

The installation of a capillary column into a modern gas chromatograph requires precise positioning of the column into both the inlet/injection port and the detector to obtain optimum analytical performance.  Individual manufacturers have different requirements for the optimum insertion length and positioning of the column which should be checked from the relevant instrument operating manual.

Tech Tip 9: Installing a capillary column into a GC inlet/detector (part I)

The installation of a capillary column into a modern gas chromatograph requires precise positioning of the column into both the inlet/injection port and the detector to obtain optimum analytical performance. Individual manufacturers have different requirements for the optimum insertion length and positioning of the column which should be checked from the relevant instrument operating manual.

Tech Tip 8: How do you know when a suspected problem really is a problem and not imagined?

Failing to identify a problem early can result in it possibly becoming a major problem with lots of down-time and costs involved in solving and fixing it. Many samples may also need to be re-analysed adding to costs, time, stress and customer satisfaction. Conversely, thinking that there is a problem when there isn't really one can also lead to all of these things with lots of tail-chasing and not really getting anywhere.
 

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